Wolfgang Bauer

Wolfgang Bauer ~ Trumpet

Wolfgang Bauer studied in Berlin with Konradin Groth at the Berlin Philharmonic's Orchesterakademie. At the age of 21 he was taken on by the RSO Franfurt while still a student as principal solo trumpeter. He stayed with that orchestra for 12 years and was also solo trumpeter with the symphony orchestra of Bavarian Radio.
He has attended intensive study courses with Lutz Köhler and Ed. H. Tarr. His breakthrough as a soloist came in 1993, when Wolfgang Bauer won the German Music Competition and the ARD International Music Competition in Munich in quick succession. Since then, he has been acknowledged as one of the leading trumpeters of his generation and has appeared as a soloist with famous orchestras like the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra London, the Orchestre National de France, the SO of Bavarian Radio, the radio symphony orchestras of Stuttgart and Frankfurt, the WDR Symphony Orchestra Cologne, the Radio Philharmonic of Hanover, the London Philharmonic Orchestra, the Polish Chamber Philharminic, and the Württemberg and Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra under conductors like Lorin Maazel, Carl St Clair, Donald Runnicles, Dimitri Kitayenko, Andrey Boreyko, Denis R. Davis and Eliahu Inbal. In 2000 Wolfgang Bauer was appointed a professor of trumpet at the "University of music and performing arts" in Stuttgart. In 2009 he was honoured with the ECHO Klassik as "best instrumental soloist of the year".
Musique baroque de TelemannMusique baroque de Telemann
Wolfgang Bauer Consort
Musique baroque de Telemann
The Wolfgang Bauer Consort plays works by Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767),
performed according to the traditions of the time:
Concerto in D for trumpet, 2 violins & B.C. ~ Concerto a 3 Clarin, Tympani, 2 Violin, Viola e Cembalo ~ Violin Sonata in A ~ Trumpet Concerto No. 2 ~ Sonatas "Sabato" & "Domenica" ~ Ouverture in D.
Soloists: Wolfgang Bauer (Baroque Trumpet), Dietlind Mayer (Violin), Petra Müllejans (Violin), Ludwig Hampe (Viola), Georg Siebert & Ingo Goritzki (Oboe)
A concert recording from the church of Monastery Maulbronn
HD Recording · DDD · c. 73 Minutes
CD
EUR 22,00SpotifyDeezerNapsterGoogle PlayApple MusicAmazon MusicTidalQobuziTunes MasteredFor...eClassical HDPrime Phonic HDPresto Classical HDReview

*****This is incredible! There are no tracks that I want to skip

This is incredible! I enjoy baroque music but am in no way a classical music buff. I had never known of Telemann until I happened upon this by chance. I heard an excerpt that totally caught my attention when I was flipping through car radio stations. It was so fetching that I immediately had to search the web to find out about Telemann & this CD. Luckily I found it. It is so tasteful. The 35 short concertos flow so well together & provide enough variety to keep it engaging using instrumentation original to the baroque era. None of it is irritating. There are no tracks that I want to skip. The lead trumpet, violin, etc. are clean , light , skillful. This CD is so beautifully done, and it has a positive effect on the soul. Highly Recommend.

TealBlue02 'TealBlue' (Mason Dixon Line, MD/DE) on Amazon

Review

Great music by a brilliant composer played by a superb ensemble

'Bachanalia' on eMusic.com

Review

The striking ambience of this particular recording was truly eye-opening...

This fine disc is yet another in the stunning series of CDs produced by the enterprising Josef-Stefan Kindler and Andreas Otto Grimminger and recorded in the sublime acoustic of the UNESCO World Heritage site of the Maulbronn monastery near Heilbronn in Germany. Telemann has become quite well served on record of late but this eclectically mixed concert is a joy just to sit back and relax with the sounds of trumpet, string instruments and clarinets competing for attention. I have recently had the opportunity to listen to several CDs from the Concentus Musicus Wien in numerous Telemann works but the striking ambience of this particular recording was truly eye-opening. Each soloist led by the able virtuoso Wolfgang Bauer brings the works to life in an uncanny sense of historically informed music making. This is a joyful disc which deserves the widest possible currency.

Gerald Fenech on Classical Net

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