Russian Chamber Philharmonic St. Petersburg

Russian Chamber Philharmonic St. Petersburg
Orchestra

The orchestra was founded in 1990 by graduates of the St. Petersburg Rimsky-Korsakoff Conservatory. The tours with Mstislav Rostropovitch, Igor Oistrakh, Mikis Theodorakis, Nina Corti and Giora Feidman as well as with opera and ballet soloists of the Moscow Bolschoi Theatre and the St. Petersburg Mariinski Opera attracted international interest. Performances in the cities of Paris, Rome, Madrid, Amsterdam, London, Frankfurt, Munich and Leipzig as well as at various festivals testify of the orchestra's exceptional status.
Louis Spohr · The Last JudgementLouis Spohr · The Last Judgement
Louis Spohr (1784-1859):
The Last Judgement
The oratorio "Die letzten Dinge"
based on verses from the Holy Scripture
in a complete live recording of the original version from 1826, sung in German,
with Miriam Meyer (Soprano), Ursula Eittinger (Mezzo-Soprano),
Marcus Ullmann (Tenor), Josef Wagner (Bass),
Maulbronn Cantor Choir (Kantorei Maulbronn),
Russian Chamber Philharmonic St. Petersburg
Conductor: Jürgen Budday
A concert recording from the church of the German
UNESCO World Heritage Site Maulbronn Monastery
HD Recording · DDD · c. 81 Minutes
CD
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5 stars out of 5 stars

Customer Votes on EMusic

Review

Spohr'’s second oratorio concerns both:
the Apocalypse and the Last Judgement

This was Spohr’s second oratorio and was written in Kassel between 1825 and 1826. The libretto, in two parts, was by Johann Friedrich Rochlitz (1769-1842) and concerns both the Apocalypse and the Last Judgement. The overture is a powerful utterance, finely put together, and orchestrated adeptly. The choral entries are often arresting, and the accompanied recitatives show awareness of oratorio antecedents but are sufficiently flexible to convince on their own terms. At its best the work impresses through a felicitous sense of word-setting and layering; the choral responses are indeed sensitively shaped. The fourth movement, with a tenor solo and chorus, calls for a repeated ‘Heilig’ and the chorus’s soft, reverential repetition vests the music with great reflectiveness and elegiac quality. Then too Spohr doesn’t stint the opportunities for some good old-fashioned fugal development. Its employment halts the narrative somewhat but is certainly incisive; that in the seventh section is very definitely reminiscent of Handel. Spohr shows in the Sinfonia introduction to the second part just how well he wrote for orchestral forces and in the Babylonian chorus (No.15) demonstrates a sure instinct for the dramatic crest of a movement. In the concluding fugal Hallelujah section he reprises the kind of Handelian statements he’d earlier established in the first part of the oratorio. There are some Mozartian touches here and there, more stentorian Beethovenian ones too, in addition to the sometimes pervasive Handelian aspect. ...

Jonathan Woolf, Musicweb International - www.musicweb-international.com

Review

Qobuz Hi-Res Audio

Awarded by Qobuz with the "Hi-Res Audio" March 2012.

Qobuz

Review

The listener is engrossed in what is going on from first note to last

This enterprising German label has recently served up some wonderfully crafted chamber and choral performances and this discovery by Spohr is no exception. Apparently 'The Last Judgement' (Die letzten Dinge - 1825/6) was an extremely popular oratorio in its heyday but it unfortunately fell by the wayside and is little heard today. Spohr treats the text with reverence and respect and although the music rarely rises above the mundane, the soloists and Budday ensure that the listener is engrossed in what is going on from first note to last. This is a worthwhile revival from the Spohr canon which deserves much wider currency.

Gerald Fenech on Classical Net

Max Bruch · MosesMax Bruch · Moses
Max Bruch:
M O S E S, Op. 67
German Oratorio in Four Parts,
performed by Peter Lika (Bass),
Birgitte Christensen (Soprano), Stefan Vinke (Tenor),
the Maulbronn Cantor Choir (Kantorei Maulbronn)
and the Russian Chamber Philharmonic St. Petersburg
Conductor: Jürgen Budday
A concert recording from the church of the German
UNESCO World Heritage Site Maulbronn Monastery
HD Recording · DDD · Double Album · c. 120 Minutes
2 CD
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An excellent project and a grandiose Performance

K&K is not a label that comes readily to mind, but after listening to this version of Bruch's Oratorio, it is certainly one that should be given more scrutiny. German based, it is totally devoted to publishing outstanding concerts of mostly sacred works recorded live in the natural ambience of Maulbronn Monastery.
The aim of all this is to make the listener experience the intensity, not only of the music but of the occasion as well. Bruch's 'Moses', premiered in January 1895, is a truly eloquent and uplifting piece very much in the 'Elijah' tradition although I found the choral writing a hint Mendelssohnian. Apparently, Brahms did not think very highly of it but Bruch revealed that it was the fruit of inner strength that enabled him to complete this work.
I enjoyed the work immensely notwithstanding Brahms' advice and found much to savour in the memorable tunes that permeate the solo numbers with Moses' death particularly moving. Both soloists and choir rise magnificently to the occasion, delivering performances that are grandiose yet saturated with a humanity that was so evident in Israel's rapport with God. The Russian Chamber Philharmonic play full bloodedly and with conviction under Jurgen Budday, who while keeping a tight reign on proceedings, allows the performance to flow with a natural ease.
An excellent project that deserves every plaudit for its unique Enterprise.

Gerald Fenech on Classical Net

Max Bruch · MosesMax Bruch · Moses
Max Bruch
M O S E S
German Oratorio Op. 67 in Four Parts,
performed by Peter Lika (Bass), Birgitte Christensen (Soprano),
Stefan Vinke (Tenor), the Maulbronn Cantor Choir (Kantorei Maulbronn)
and the Russian Chamber Philharmonic St. Petersburg
Conductor: Jürgen Budday
A concert recording from the church of the German
UNESCO World Heritage Site Maulbronn Monastery
HD Recording · DDD · Duration: 120 Min. 55 Sec.
Digital Double Album · 15 Tracks
MP3

MP3 Album

320 kBit/sec.

EUR 19,80SpotifyDeezerNapsterApple MusicTIDALAmazon MusiciTunes MasteredFor...Qobuz HDPrime Phonic HDeClassical HDPresto Classical HDReview

An excellent project and a grandiose Performance

K&K is not a label that comes readily to mind, but after listening to this version of Bruch's Oratorio, it is certainly one that should be given more scrutiny. German based, it is totally devoted to publishing outstanding concerts of mostly sacred works recorded live in the natural ambience of Maulbronn Monastery.
The aim of all this is to make the listener experience the intensity, not only of the music but of the occasion as well. Bruch's 'Moses', premiered in January 1895, is a truly eloquent and uplifting piece very much in the 'Elijah' tradition although I found the choral writing a hint Mendelssohnian. Apparently, Brahms did not think very highly of it but Bruch revealed that it was the fruit of inner strength that enabled him to complete this work.
I enjoyed the work immensely notwithstanding Brahms' advice and found much to savour in the memorable tunes that permeate the solo numbers with Moses' death particularly moving. Both soloists and choir rise magnificently to the occasion, delivering performances that are grandiose yet saturated with a humanity that was so evident in Israel's rapport with God. The Russian Chamber Philharmonic play full bloodedly and with conviction under Jurgen Budday, who while keeping a tight reign on proceedings, allows the performance to flow with a natural ease.
An excellent project that deserves every plaudit for its unique Enterprise.

Gerald Fenech on Classical Net

Vol. 12: The most beautiful Concert Highlights 2010-2011Vol. 12: The most beautiful Concert Highlights 2010-2011
The 20th Anniversary of the Maulbronn Monastery Edition
The most beautiful Concert Highlights
from Maulbronn Monastery 2010-2011

The 50th Anniversary of the Maulbronn Monastery Concerts
Anniversary Series, Vol. 12

Highlights from
Spohr: The Last Judgement, WoO 61 (June 12 & 13, 2010)
The concert "The Period of Time" (June 20, 2010):
Schop: O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort & Lachrimae Pavaen
Telemann: Viola da Gamba Sonata, TWV 41:G6 & Die Zeit, TWV 20:23
Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach: Am neuen Jahre: Er ruft der Sonn und schafft den Mond
The Choral Concert "The Night shines as the Day" (July 3, 2010):
Whitacre: Sleep · Brahms: Guten Abend, gut Nacht (Wiegenlied, Op. 49 No. 4)
The Concert "Concert for Strings, Flute & English Horn" (July 9, 2010):
Tchaikovsky: Souvenir de Florence, Op. 70 · Stephenson: Concerto for Cor Anglais & String Orchestra
The Piano Recital "Grand Piano Masters ~ Dreamscenes" (June 4, 2011):
Schumann: Fantasy Pieces for Piano, Op. 12 · Brahms: Piano Sonata No. 3 in F Minor, Op. 5
Brahms: A German Requiem, Op. 45 ("London Version") (October 1 & 2, 2011)
Live recordings from the German UNESCO World Heritage Site Maulbronn Monastery
HD Recordings · DDD · Duration: c. 129 Minutes
Digital Album · 24 Tracks · incl. Digital Booklet
FILES
EUR 9,90SpotifyDeezerNapsterGoogle PlayApple MusicAmazon MusicAmazon DownloadsTIDALPrime-phoniciTunes MasteredFor...Qobuz HDHD TracksPresto Classical HD

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