Symphonies & Concertos

Symphonies & Concertos
CDs and Longplay Music Releases:
Symphonies & Concertos
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Corelli's Legacy · EU Baroque Orchestra
CD
EUR 22,00Corelli's Legacy · EU Baroque Orchestra
Castle Concerts
Corelli's Legacy
Baroque Music by Arcangelo Corelli and his 'students', performed according to the traditions of the time by the European Union Baroque Orchestra
Concertmaster & Violin Soloist: Kinga Ujszászi
Music Director & Violin Soloist: Riccardo Minasi
Works by Pietro Castrucci (1679-1752), Giuseppe Valentini (1681-1753), Giovanni Mossi (c.1680-1742), Antonio Maria Montanari (1676-1737), Arcangelo Corelli (1653-1713), Gasparo Visconti (1683-1713) and Francesco Geminiani (1687-1762)
A concert recording from Bad Homburg Castle
CD Audio · DDD · Duration: c. 80 Minutes
KuK 110 · ISBN 978-3-942801-10-2
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Recommended in all aspects
'Corelli's Legacy' from the K&K Verlagsanstalt label offers Baroque music enthusiasts a listening experience which is unique on several fronts. Subtitled 'Baroque Music by Arcangelo Corelli and his "Students"', the album surveys the far-reaching influence this great violinist and composer had on his contemporaries. Aside from works by Corelli and Geminiani, lesser known composers represented are Pietro Castrucci (1679-1752), Giuseppe Valentini (1681-1753), Giovanni Mossi (c.1680-1742), Antonio Maria Montanari (1676-1737) and Gasparo Visconti (1683-1713). The European Union Baroque Orchestra performs under director and violinist Riccardo Minasi.
The recording is from a series titled Authentic Classical Concerts. This particular release is part of a series called 'Castle Concerts', the basic concept of which is to capture live concerts in settings where these pieces might first have been heard. In this case, it is the town church in Bad Homburg, Germany which Wilhelm II had turned into one of the most intimate and beautiful concert halls in Europe. The hall was forgotten over time, and has only recently been restored to its original splendor.
The European Union Baroque Orchestra is an ephemeral group, with its membership changing every year. The young players are selected from all over Europe, each being a specialist in early music performance. For six months out of the year, they are on tour, giving concerts in interesting and historic venues. The orchestra has performed under the directorship of some of the most eminent early music specialists in the Europe, including Roy Goodman, Ton Koopman, Gottfried von der Goltz and Paul Agnew. This Corelli's Legacy concert was directed by violinist Riccardo Minasi, who also performs. Mr. Minasi has appeared with Europe's leading early music ensembles, including Le Concert des Nations; Concerto Italiano and Il Giardino Armonico.
The playing is very fine and the energy of the live performance is palpable. The recording does give a sense of the intimacy of the venue; we are up quite close to the performers. This does results in a little stage noise and you can hear the inhale of the players before they begin playing, but this is just as it would be had you been in attendance. Recommended for the music, performances, engineering and a very unique concept.
Expedition Audio - Music that deserves to be heard
Review
***** 5 Stars
Beautiful and powerful
'William L.' on Amazon.com (Verified Purchase)
Grand Piano Masters · Piano Concertos by Beethoven & Ustvolskaya
CD
EUR 22,00Grand Piano Masters · Piano Concertos by Beethoven & Ustvolskaya
Grand Piano Masters
Piano Concertos by Beethoven & Ustvolskaya
Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827):
Piano Concerto No. 2 in B-Flat Major, Op. 19
World Premiere Recording of the version for Piano & String Orchestra
by Vinzenz Lachner (1811-1893)
Galina Ustvolskaya (1919-2006):
Concerto for Piano, Strings & Timpani
With courtesy of Hans Sikorski Music Publishing Hamburg
Patricia Hase (Piano) · Ensemble Galina
Conductor: Peter Leipold
A concert recording from the Richard-Jakoby-Hall
of the Hanover University of Music, Drama & Media in Germany
Music Album & CD · DDD · c. 49 Minutes
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***** Wonderful performance and very good recording quality
Wonderful performance and very good recording quality. I love the beauty of the interpretation and the combination of the two works!
An Amazon Customer on July 31, 2016 - Customer Rating: 5 stars out of 5
Review
Featured on Spotify
This release is featured on the Spotify list of 50 notable classical new releases
Spotify Editorial
Review
The first recording played without blunders is out!
The first recording of the Concerto for Piano, Strings & Timpani played without blunders is out!
'Galina Ustvolskaya official' on Facebook
Review
The Hannover-based pianist Patricia Hase has just released the Grand Piano Masters: Concertos by Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) & Galina Ustvolskaya with conductor Peter Leipold and Ensemble Galina in with the record label K&K Verlagsanstalt this summer. A coffee addict and an avid reader who listens to German rap band Cro when she works out, Patricia tells primephonic’s Rina Sitorus about the new recording and her biggest wish in music.
Could you tell us about your newest album?
It’s very special for me to have recorded this album, because the conductor Peter Leipold and I are very close friends for many years now. It is so special for me to have this album recorded with him and the orchestra, Ensemble Galina. These wonderful concertos of Beethoven and Galina Ustvolskaya are two works which I'm addicted to.
Beethoven really is one of my favorite composers. It feels very natural for me to play his music. His early concertos are so fresh and full of spirit. The orchestra is young, the conductor is young, and I am young, so it was great to bring the spirit out of Beethoven's early works from his younger years. And Galina Ustvolskaya is one of the most impressive composers I've ever encountered. She was so strict and her music is uncomprimising, which really impressed me. I have a feeling that she really wanted to say something and not just merely make nice music.
The combination comes naturally - both works were written when the composers were young. I find that music written in that time of a person’s life actually says so much about our world today. It's hard to say which one I like better, I like both works just as much.  
You mention that the music is a reflection of the world today. Could you elaborate on that?
I think the main themes are always the same: love, passion, death, religion. What Beethoven wrote are the same main themes which belong to us today. It's really important to show the audience that his music is absolutely modern and it is important for us to get connected to our feelings and our lives. 
With all that in mind, I suppose you had had some kind of overall theme or mood in the back of your mind prior to the recording. Are you pleased with the final outcome?
Yes I had a very clear idea of how it should sound and how the music should feel. I was very hard on myself during the preparation – everything had to be better and better. But then, this recording was special because it was a live recording, so we only had one chance to get it right. So I stopped thinking when I entered the stage. My wish in that moment was to give everything I have and to leave my heart at that place, at that moment. Beforehand, I had been thinking it through so much, but once it started, I just let go, had fun and felt what was in the air. Maybe that’s what music is all about.
I hope one can hear that from the album.
Tell me about the audience during the recording.
It is always so interesting to see the audience. Their reactions are always so different every time. Every concert is very different but there is always a special atmosphere.
I remember the audience during the last recording so well. It was so quiet in the hall. It was in my hometown, Hannover, and there were many people in the audience who I knew. They were crossing fingers and I could feel that!
It was also so nice that backstage, right before we started, we all came together, for a big hug and I had the feeling that we had a great connection together. I had a feeling that everybody would give the best of what he or she can. It was such an amazing feeling, knowing that everybody wants to give their best. 
How would you describe the collaboration between you, Peter Leipold and Ensemble Galina?
Well, Peter and I know each other for many years and I learned so much about music from him. I performed my first piano concerto with him conducting. Then there was a time when we were just thinking: ‘We know so many wonderful musicians, why don't we bring them together and see what happens?’ We are professional colleagues but we are also really good friends with a good connection. I think people can hear it on the album, that when we come together, there is such a nice atmosphere. To play this first recording with so many friends on stage playing together was so amazing. I feel so proud when I see the album.
Is it too early to ask about how the reaction to your latest album has been?
We got so much feedback – the media wrote very very nice things about us! Konstantin Bagrenin, Galina’s widower, wrote us a letter and he was really impressed and that his wife would have loved it. I think I could cry!
What can we expect in the near future?
The label KuK wants to make another recording with me and maybe with the orchestra. We are still brainstorming about the project, but we have cool ideas, though we have to keep it secret at the moment. But don't you worry, more is coming!
What about your own project(s)?
Well I have a lot of concerts planned, and there is a possibility of a solo recording. It could be Schubert, my other favourite composer.
Where will you be in 10 years?
I hope I can play piano and continue being on stage for my whole life. It'll be great if I get the chance to make music and keep going in this very special and wonderful direction. But you never know what’s going to happen. I'm completely relaxed, so we'll see – the rest will come.
Any names you'd like to work with?
I really really like the violinist Isabelle Faust. It would be great for me to play with her, and I also really like the pianist Maria João Pires. I think she's so absolutely amazing. And so many conductors! Maybe to play once with the Berlin Philharmonic – of course that is the dream of every musician, I think. I played a lot with horn player Felix Klieser. These were such amazing experiences and maybe there's another chance to play with him again.
What do you do when you're not busy with recordings or concerts and how do you balance your music with other obligations, such as friends and family?
I really like to play sports and I'm addicted to coffee and chocolate. Sitting in a cafe, having a nice coffee while talking to a friend: that is the real Patricia. And I also like reading: from criminal stuff to music, biographies, funny stuff; I read everything!Balancing my music with the rest is much easier than I had thought it would be. I have many friends from all over the world which is perfect, since in most cities I play, there is somebody I know. I'm very connected to them through technology. And my family lives all over the world, so I'm used to that. I think the point is, they've already known me this way since the beginning. Because I also make music together with friends, we can combine friendship and the work. Sometimes during rehearsals with the orchestra we really have to be careful that we are not only talking about other [non-musical] stuff. People bring cakes, and during break we can talk about 'important private' stuff!
What is your biggest wish as a musician?
To break the distance between the audience and the people on stage. Sometimes I feel that the people in the audience are just watching the people who are on stage, so I find it important to get everything connected.
How would you achieve that?
I often talk to the audience and explain something about the works. Other times I tell them what I feel when I play, or just ideas of what it could be and leave it open, so that we can discuss it afterwards. For me it is interesting to know what the audience thinks. It makes it more alive and brings it closer to the present day.
Patricia Hase, in conversation with primephonic's Rina Sitorus
Mozart · Piano Concertos I · Nos. 17 & 23
CD
EUR 22,00Mozart · Piano Concertos I · Nos. 17 & 23
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart:
Piano Concertos I
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart:
Concerto No. 17 in G Major, K. 453
& Concerto No. 23 in A Major, K. 488
Christoph Soldan (Piano)
Cappella Istropolitana
Conductor: Pawel Przytocki
Concert recording from the church of the UNESCO World Heritage Site Maulbronn Monastery
CD · DDD · c. 60 Minutes
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***** Stunning acoustics
This monastery is world famous. Spectacular decay, luminous sound, superb performances... Try this series and see what you think.
'John K.' on Amazon.com
Review
A wonderful Disc
This wonderful disc recorded in the splendor of the Maulbronn Monastery continues to cement K&K's reputation as a purveyor of quality classical music. Their Mozart piano concerto series has so far been quite exquisite on all counts this time with Christoph Soldan at the piano. KV453 floats along quite merrily, especially in the broad Finale which has the Capella Istropolitana playing like angels, ably directed by Pawel Przytocki. The same goes for KV488, one of the miracles of Mozart's piano concertos which can easily hold its own with former greats in the genre such as Wilhelm Kempff and Géza Anda. My only gripe in this series is the paucity of notes which accompany the issues otherwise both recording and interpretation are of impeccable quality throughout. Those who are collecting this fine series really need not hesitate in any way and should go ahead with purchasing this issue.
Gerald Fenech on Classical Net, Copyright 2009
Musique baroque de Telemann
CD
EUR 22,00Musique baroque de Telemann
Musique baroque de Telemann
The Wolfgang Bauer Consort plays works by Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767), performed according to the traditions of the time:
Concerto in D for trumpet, 2 violins & B.C. ~ Concerto a 3 Clarin, Tympani, 2 Violin, Viola e Cembalo ~ Violin Sonata in A ~ Trumpet Concerto No. 2 ~ Sonatas "Sabato" & "Domenica" ~ Ouverture in D.
Soloists: Wolfgang Bauer (Baroque Trumpet), Dietlind Mayer (Violin), Petra Müllejans (Violin), Ludwig Hampe (Viola), Georg Siebert & Ingo Goritzki (Oboe)
A concert recording from the church of Monastery Maulbronn
CD · DDD · c. 73 Minutes
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*****This is incredible! There are no tracks that I want to skip
This is incredible! I enjoy baroque music but am in no way a classical music buff. I had never known of Telemann until I happened upon this by chance. I heard an excerpt that totally caught my attention when I was flipping through car radio stations. It was so fetching that I immediately had to search the web to find out about Telemann & this CD. Luckily I found it. It is so tasteful. The 35 short concertos flow so well together & provide enough variety to keep it engaging using instrumentation original to the baroque era. None of it is irritating. There are no tracks that I want to skip. The lead trumpet, violin, etc. are clean , light , skillful. This CD is so beautifully done, and it has a positive effect on the soul. Highly Recommend.
TealBlue02 'TealBlue' (Mason Dixon Line, MD/DE) on Amazon
Review
Great music by a brilliant composer played by a superb ensemble
'Bachanalia' on eMusic.com
Review
The striking ambience of this particular recording was truly eye-opening...
This fine disc is yet another in the stunning series of CDs produced by the enterprising Josef-Stefan Kindler and Andreas Otto Grimminger and recorded in the sublime acoustic of the UNESCO World Heritage site of the Maulbronn monastery near Heilbronn in Germany. Telemann has become quite well served on record of late but this eclectically mixed concert is a joy just to sit back and relax with the sounds of trumpet, string instruments and clarinets competing for attention. I have recently had the opportunity to listen to several CDs from the Concentus Musicus Wien in numerous Telemann works but the striking ambience of this particular recording was truly eye-opening. Each soloist led by the able virtuoso Wolfgang Bauer brings the works to life in an uncanny sense of historically informed music making. This is a joyful disc which deserves the widest possible currency.
Gerald Fenech on Classical Net
Schubert & Mendelssohn: Symphonies
CD
EUR 22,00Schubert & Mendelssohn: SymphoniesFranz Schubert: Symphony No.8 B Minor "The Unfinished"
Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy: Symphony No.3 A Minor Op. 56 "Scottish"
performed by the New Symphony Orchestra Sofia. Conductor: Petko Dimitrov.
A concert recording from the National Palace of Culture in Sofia (Bulgaria)
CD · DDD · c. 64 Minutes
SpotifyClassics OnlineReview
A memorable performance
Young players excel in compelling live performances of two favourite symphonies
The members of the New Symphony Orchestra, drawn from the Sofia Radio Orchestra, are a comparatively young ensemble founded in 1971. The writer of the insert-note suggests that their musical style is "sentimental, due to the members' experience recording film music". Sorry, but there is no trace of sentimentality in either performance. Instead, here is a superb example of the intense concentration that can come with live musicmaking from eager young players, well rehearsed, in front of a receptive audience.
In the Scottish Symphony, the character of the playing combines an effervescing vitality and a natural Slavonic warmth, particularly from the full-toned strings. Petko Dimitrov shapes Mendelssohn's lovely lyrical opening with an appealing simplicity, and in the first climax of the vivace of the exposition his surge of animation has the players all but scampering in their exhilaration. The one snag is that the important exposition repeat is, alas, omitted. The scherzo sparkles, the slow movement is beautifully shaped yet has a sombre underlay which prevents any suggestion of blandness, and after the dancing vivacissimo the close of the finale is expansive, almost Klemperer-like in its spacious grandeur. Overall, a performance of much character.
Schubert's Unfinished is even finer, the epitome of Romanticism, the quiet opening mysterious, darkly evocative, yet with incisive drama soon to offset the lyricism. Here the exposition repeat is played, and used to build an onward propulsion which is very compelling. Dimitrov's modest change of pace for the exquisitely gentle opening of the second movement is perfectly judged, and the arrival of the secondary theme is beautifully prepared by the violins. The woodwind contributions, first the clarinet (2'06'') and the naturally following, equally delicate oboe (2'36'') are almost like a question and answer, before the drama of the bold trombone-dominated tutti (2'56'') which is arresting without being coarse.
But it is the gently ruminative quality of the playing - of wind and strings alike - that makes this performance so memorable. The interplay between apparent serenity and the music's bolder progress is like a contrast between twilight apprehension and the daylight assertion of life's irrepressible advance, with a haunting sense of resignation conveyed in the movement's guileless closing bars. The concert hall recording was made in simple 'two-track stereo' and the effect is real, slightly distanced, but tangible. Most rewarding.
Ivan March, Gramophone Magazine
The Art Of Conduction · Dvorak & Mozart
CD
EUR 22,00The Art Of Conduction · Dvorak & Mozart
The Art Of Conduction · Dvorak & Mozart
Concerts conducted by Pawel Przytocki:
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart:
Symphony No. 36 in C Major, K. 425 "Linz"
Orchesta: Schlesische Kammerphilharmonie Kattowitz
A concert at the church of Maulbronn Monastery 2002.
Antonín Dvorák:
Serenade for String Orchestra in E Major, Opus 22
Orchestra: Beethoven Academy Orchestra Krakau
A concert at the Bad Homburg Castle 2007.
CD · DDD · c. 58 Minutes
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***** BEST RECORDING
This is the best recording I have found of Dvorak's String Serenade!
A customer on iTunes
Review
***** My favourite
Your version of Dvorak's String Serenade is my favourite... Gotta loveit...damn! This guy is so good!
A listener on YouTube
Review
***** An ideal introduction
An ideal introduction to one of Poland's most talented and exciting young conductors, whose work has been compared to that of Carlos Kleiber and Svjatoslav Richter.
New Classics UK
Review
***** Five Stars
PLEASED. ORDER.
Laura J Hefner on Amazon.com
(Verified purchase of the Audio CD)
Review
BEST SELLER on Amazon.com
February 16, 2015: Dvorak's String Serenade Op.22 is BEST SELLER on Amazon.com:
Best Sellers Rank 1 in 'Symphonies / Romantic'
Best Sellers Rank 2 in 'Periods / Romantic'
Best Sellers Rank 3 in 'Symphonies / Classical'
Review
***** Superb
I heard this piece (Dvorak's String Serenade) at a summer concert in Symphony Hall and was thoroughly enchanted by it. I downloaded it on to my ipod and it features regularly. It is a very melodic, uplifting, life-enhancing piece, superbly played.
Mr. P. Skeldon on Amazon.uk (Verified Purchase)
Review
A heady experience...
This beautifully-recorded CD brings together two fine works in what can only be termed as superb interpretations by Polish orchestras. K&K are an extremely enterprising German label who have given us some outstanding recordings in the choral, organ and piano and genre from such wonderful locations as centuries old monasteries so their new attention to orchestral music is very commendable indeed. Mozart's 'Linz' is one of those works were a carefully nuanced approach reaps considerable dividends as the great Peter Maag amply demonstrated. Przytocki is a consummate interpreter bringing a beautiful lift to the First movement and a busy energy to the Finale which are two miraculously charged movements. He is also in his element in the lovely Serenade for Strings by Dvořák which dances around quite ravishingly especially in the bucolic scherzo. This CD receives plaudits all around from me and it deserves a hearty recommendation. The presentation is beautiful with large photographs and the distinctive K&K colours provide for a heady experience which is reinforced by the interpretations.
Gerald Fenech on Classical Net
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