Slobodan Jovanović

Slobodan Jovanovic
Slobodan Jovanovic

Slobodan Jovanović ~ Cembalist & Fortepiano Player

Slobodan Jovanović was born in 1977 in Pančevo (Serbia). He studied harpsichord and clavichord with Robert Hill and basso continuo with Michael Behringer in Freiburg i. Br. In Karlsruhe he studied fortepiano and chamber music with Kristian Nyquist. He is also trained as a professional organist. Alongside harpsichordists Colin Tilney und Huguette Dreyfus he attended various master classes as a scholarship holder. As well as this he perfected his basso continuo under Jesper Bøje Christensen.
Slobodan Jovanović has appeared in most European countries as a sought after chamber music partner and soloist. He performed as a continuo player with conductors like Reinhard Goebel, Radoslaw Szulc and in several ensembles and orchestras, among them with La Folia, L'arpa festante, Mannheimer Mozartorchester, Nationaltheater-Orchester Mannheim as well as with the Karlsruher Barockorchester. Since several years he is also accompanist (répétiteur) with the International Händel-Akademie in Karlsruhe (Germany). During the season 2016 und 2017 Jovanović played, among other music, all six Brandenburg Concertos by J.S. Bach in diverse concerts with Philharmonie Baden-Baden - as part of the cooperation with this orchestra.
In 2002 he made his debut on ARS MUSICI label with harpsichord sonatas by Franz Anton Maichelbeck (1702-1750). The "harpsichord live electronic" project, with music from the composer Roland Breitenfeld, was brought out on CD (new works for harpsichord and live electronics) in 2001 with Slobodan Jovanović on harpsichord. Recordings of his own harpsichord compositions followed in 2004. His own chamner music has been released in 2014 on the label IFO classics (CD audio Album: "Scene In Circle" with the german label IFO classics, performed by Ensemble Serene Destination. IFO 00 222). In July 2016 his second CD with IFO classics has been released (audio album "Images Without Frames", IFO 00 551), this time with harpsichord work by Frescobaldi, Froberger and Louis Couperin, as well with his own cycle for harpsichord Images Without Frames.
As a composer Slobodan Jovanović consistently pursues the idea of fusion of musical styles and tonal languages. In spring 2014 he started a large scale project, Evelasting Opera, in which over the long term various self-contained vocal-instrumental works ("opera") are to be created.
Fantasies & Illusions ~ Bach's Sons and the FortepianoFantasies & Illusions ~ Bach's Sons and the Fortepiano
Fantasies & Illusions
Bach's Sons and the Fortepiano

Slobodan Jovanović (Fortepiano/Hammerflügel) plays

Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach (1714-1788):
Sonata No. 4 in A Major, Wq 55,4 (H. 186), from: "For Connoisseurs & Amateurs", 1st Collection
& Fantasia in F-Sharp Minor, Wq 67 (H. 300) "C.P.E. Bach's Impressions"

Wilhelm Friedemann Bach (1710-1784):
12 Polonaises, Falck 12 & Fantasia in A Minor, Falck 23

Slobodan Jovanović (*1977):
Iluzija

A recording from the Laurentius Church in Karlsruhe (Germany)

HD Recording · DDD · Duration: c. 79 Minutes


CD
EUR 22,00SpotifyDeezerNapsterGoogle PlayApple MusicNaxos Music LibraryYouTube MusicAmazon.com MusicTIDALPrimephonicIDAGIOAmazon.comiTunes Apple Digital MasterQobuz HDeClassical HDPresto Classical HDHD TracksYouTube PlaylistReview

Featured by Spotify

This release is featured in the editorial Spotify playlist of handpicked new classical releases - August 2, 2019

Spotify Editorial Staff

Review

**** Marvelous music, played with verve and dazzling dexterity

The Bach sons referenced, in this album's title, Fantasies & Illusions - Bach's Sons and the Fortepiano, are Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach and his older brother Wilhelm Friedemann. The pianist for this disc, Serbian-born Slobodan Jovanovic, also contributes a brief piece, and penned the extensive program notes about the music. Unfortunately, they are printed in German only, a language I barely know, so I cannot comment on their usefulness. What I can report with confidence is that the music is marvelous, and Jovanovic plays it with verve and dazzling dexterity. The chief thing to know about the Bach boys is that, despite having been instructed almost exclusively by their great father, the music that they produced represented a distinctive break from the world of the Baroque. C. P. E. Bach gives us rather more imaginative and lively music than his sibling, especially so in the fast outer movements of the Classically designed sonata. This music is bursting with joy. But he was also capable of considerable depth and repose, as in the beautiful Adagio of the sonata. The large Fantasia, clocking in here at 11 and a half minutes, is a work of extraordinary inventiveness, and most likely represents a setting down of one or more of the improvisations that the composer was widely renowned for. To my ears it sounds like a precursor to the Rondo in A Minor of Mozart.
Wilhelm Friedemann Bach's polonaises are not as zesty as C. P. E.'s works, but just as expertly constructed, with an added layer of gracefulness that sets them apart. The polonaise format was very popular in late 18th century Germany, although these brief, lighthearted pieces have nothing in common with the massive works that Chopin was to create in the same name a generation later. I first encountered this music many years ago at a live performance by the superb American fortepianist Andrew Willis. There are only a handful of recordings of this delightful music available (alas, Willis not among them), and so this new recording is very welcome, especially given the fine recorded sound and the superbly colorful palette of Susanne Merzdorf's excellent reproduction of a 1782 Anton Walter instrument.
Jovanovic's own music, which dates to 1996, is quirky but intriguing, reminding me of a music box that starts out with a simple, sing-song tune, then begins to malfunction, leading it into odd key changes and rhythmic hiccups before somehow fixing itself and returning to proper working order. He rather bravely inserts the five-minute piece among the polonaises, but despite vast stylistic differences, there is a sense of mutual intellectual curiosity that tends to make the whole sequence flow surprisingly smoothly.

Review

Peter Burwasser - Fanfare Magazine,
also published on Amazon.com, February 2020

Soundscape Rastatt Favorite Palace: GallantrySoundscape Rastatt Favorite Palace: Gallantry
Soundscape Rastatt Favorite Palace
Galanterie · Gallantry

The Quantz Collegium plays
Concertos for Flute, Viola, Strings & Basso continuo:

Christoph Graupner (1683-1760): Concerto for Viola in D Major, GWV 314

Friedrich Wilhelm Heinrich Benda (1745-1814): Concerto for Flute in G Major, Op. 4.1

Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767): Concerto for Viola in G Major, TWV 51:G9

Christoph Graupner (1683-1760): Concerto for Flute & Viola in D Minor, GWV 725

Artistic Director: Jochen Baier

A live recording from Rastatt Favorite Palace in Germany

HD Recording · DDD · Duration: c. 59 Minutes


CD
EUR 22,00SpotifyDeezerNapsterGoogle PlayYouTube MusicApple MusicNaxos Music LibraryTIDALAmazon MusicAmazon DownloadsPrime-phoniciTunes MasteredFor...Qobuz HDPresto Classical HDHD TracksPro Studio Masters HDStaatliche Schlösser und Gärten Baden-Württemberg

The Rastatt Favorite Palace in Germany

This concert took place in the "Sala Terrena" (Garden Hall) of Rastatt Favorite Palace (Schloss Favorite Rastatt) in Germany. The Palace is the oldest German "porcelain palace" and the only one to survive almost unchanged to this day. The palace and the garden are one of 60 historic monuments in the Germany's Southwest. The "State Organisation for Palaces and Gardens of Baden-Württemberg" (in German: "Staatliche Schlösser und Gärten Baden-Württemberg") makes accessible, communicate, develops and preserves these state-owned historic monuments with the aim of preserving the authenticity of the cultural heritage, filling them with life and preserving them for future generations. Detailed information about these unique "Soundscapes" can be found at: www.schloesser-und-gaerten.de


Review

***** A memorable mash-up

A musical revolution occurred in about 1720, with the "style galant" replacing the more learned and complicated music in vogue before then. K&K Verlagsanstalt, which specializes in audiophile recordings made in historic churches and palaces, has put together a winning project here, with the venerable Quantz Collegium (established in 1936) performing highly appealing music from the Garden Hall of the Rastatt Favorite Palace in Baden-Württemberg. Recorded at two live concerts, we have here four concertos for viola or flute, or both, by Graupner, Telemann and FWH Benda, all written in the accessible, tuneful new style. Mention should be made of Josef-Stefan Kindler's superb photos in the CD notes, which I at first took for paintings in the Rococo style of Tiepolo. They capture both the spirit of the original music and venue and that of the Quantz Collegium and K&K's Historically Informed reconstructions.
"Every current of fashion or of worldview", says Walter Benjamin in The Arcades Project, "derives its force from what is forgotten." Three centuries on, the stripping down of J. S. Bach's erudite polyphonic puzzles can seem, according to one's sensibilities or mood, either a vital breath of fresh air or a savage dumbing down for the kind of mindless 18th century twits personified by Hugh Laurie's Prince George in Blackadder's Third Series. Luckily we can still take pleasure in the simple joys of melody and a direct and honest, if sometimes guileless, clarity. This music is well-crafted, but the strongest movements, those in Telemann's Viola Concerto especially, can seem very much self-aware. It won't be long before the streamlining process leads to a new round of mannerist complexities.
Though one won't find the final degree of authentic style from the Quantz Collegium, including the three soloists, flutist Jochen Baier and violists Agata Zieba and Killian Ziegler, there is much to admire in these performances. The admirably spare technology and truly galant way of playing combined with the elaborate costumes and the rococo porcelain excesses of the venue make for a memorable mash-up.

Dean Frey on several-instruments.blogspot.com and on Arkiv Music

User login

courtesy of webmatter.de

Back
Zurück